Update Regarding EHV-1 (April 14)

We are happy to report that through 14 days of quarantine, none of the potentially exposed horses have shown signs of fever or illness. We are continuing to monitor the horses closely, and should we not have any fevers develop, we will be able to discharge the eight horses on Friday, April 21.

The index patient continues to remain under treatment in our isolation facility, and after having exceeded the protocols set forth by the NJ Department of Agriculture, we have re-opened the hospital and have been busily admitting patients.

B.W. Furlong & Associates is committed to continuing to provide exceptional care to all our clients and patients and we look forward to the resolution of this quarantine!

Update regarding EHV-1 Positive Test

Thank you to all who have reached out with positive comments for our team. All potentially exposed horses continue to be closely monitored and cared for by our staff in an off-site facility, and as of this evening the horses have shown no signs of fever or illness. The index patient remains under treatment in our isolation facility. We have concluded multiple rounds of cleaning and disinfecting in the hospital, and we will begin accepting patients Saturday, April 08.

B.W. Furlong & Associates is committed to continuing to provide exceptional care to all our clients and patients and we will provide any additional information as the situation is resolved.

Statement regarding EHV-1

B.W. Furlong & Associates’s statement regarding the EHV-1 Positive Horse

Recently a patient at our facility tested positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). The patient is in our isolation unit, removed from our main facilities, and is under the care of Rachel Gardner, DVM, DACVIM and her team of veterinarians and technicians. The index horse has no history of recent travel therefore no other horses in the area are expected to be at increased risk at this time. The potentially exposed horses have been transported via closed commercial carrier to a separate quarantine facility and will continue to be cared for by B.W. Furlong & Associates veterinarians and technicians. The established quarantine area has been reviewed by the state veterinarians and they have confirmed that it exceeds expectations put forth by the Department of Agriculture.

All of our affected clients have been notified of the situation and we will continue to maintain contact. We anticipate being able to resume normal business hours as of Saturday, April 8 without state restrictions on the main facility. It is our intention to exceed the state’s recommended biosecurity protocols, therefore we have increased biosecurity measures at all of our locations. The quarantine is not imposed on Equine MRI of NJ or Furlong’s Soundness Center and our ambulatory veterinary services are continuing without restriction.

We will continue providing exceptional care to our clients and patients and will provide any additional information as we resolve the situation.

More information can be found on the American Association of Equine Practitioners website, here, and the memo from the Department of Agriculture can be found here. Should you have further questions or concerns, we encourage you to contact your B.W. Furlong & Associates veterinarian or Dr. Gardner at (908) 439-2821.

Employment Opportunity: FSC Barn Assistant

Employment Opportunity: Furlong’s Soundness Center Barn Assistant
Employer: Furlong’s Soundness Center
Employment start date: April 17, 2016
Employment type: Part-time (16-30 hours depending on season)

B.W. Furlong & Associates is an equine veterinary practice headquartered in Oldwick, NJ. The practice employs 14 veterinarians that practice in the Northeast, as well as 3 that practice in Florida and Virginia under the name Peak Performance Equine Services. It is an extremely fast-paced and busy practice, serving and caring for some of the most prestigious clientele in the country. The main practice consists of a full service ambulatory division, as well as a 4 acre facility that houses a full service 12 stall hospital, stallion collection station, lab, and advanced imaging capabilities. It also has separate properties that include a standing MRI and a rehabilitation center, Furlong’s Soundness Center (FSC). FSC includes an RLT Therapeutic Laser System, water treadmill, spa, and Euro-walker. Employees of the company are all expected to demonstrate the core beliefs.

Responsibilities

  • Care for patients, including, but not limited to, grooming, feeding, mucking out, cleaning feed & water buckets, and turning out
  • Hand walk horses
  • Assist in rehab treatments
  • Assist in farrier appointments
  • Prep horses for treatments
  • Track care and treatment in medical records
  • Care and maintain property and treatment facilities, including, but not limited to: scrubbing/disinfecting stalls, cleaning & preparing treatment areas, dusting and sweeping stalls and aisles, cleaning outdoor areas
  • Additional responsibilities as needed

Qualifications

  • Background in equine care
  • Exceptional horse handling skills
  • Good time management and multitasking skills
  • Ability to work effectively independently
  • Comfortable handling patient emergency situations
  • Capable of heavy lifting, including hay bales, feed bags, and muck buckets

Hours are as follows: Tuesday & Thursday, 8a-12p, Saturday 8a-5p, and Sunday 2 hours of work (flexible timing). Summer hours may be extended based on workload. Benefits include hourly pay commensurate with experience and discounted veterinary services and products.

Please submit your cover letter and resume via email to Adam Furlong, Project Manager, at hiring@bwfurlong.com

Employment Opportunity: MRI Assistant (FT/S) – Summer 2017

Employment Opportunity: Equine MRI of NJ Assistant
Employer: B.W. Furlong & Associates
Employment start date: May 1, 2017
Employment type: Full-Time, Seasonal

B.W. Furlong & Associates is an equine veterinary practice headquartered in Oldwick, NJ. The practice employs 14 veterinarians that practice in the Northeast, as well as 3 that practice in Florida and Virginia under the name Peak Performance Equine Services. It is an extremely fast-paced and busy practice, serving and caring for some of the most prestigious clientele in the country. The main practice consists of a full service ambulatory division, as well as a 4 acre facility that houses a full service 12 stall hospital, stallion collection station, lab, and advanced imaging capabilities. It also has separate properties that include a standing MRI and a rehabilitation center. Employees of the company are all expected to demonstrate the core beliefs.

B.W. Furlong & Associates is looking for an individual that is available for daily availability at Equine MRI of NJ, assisting with handling and preparing horses. This job is ideal for high school or college-age students looking to gain further experience in the equine veterinary industry. The summer position will be every weekday as needed, with weekly hours ranging between 25 and 35 hours, between the hours of 7:30am and 5:30pm. Candidates must have comfort and a demonstrated history of handling & jogging horses of all types, and be able to stand for several hours next to the horse. Candidate must also be able to demonstrate common sense and be quick thinking in an occasional emergency situation. The ideal candidate will have experience handling (walking, maneuvering) sedated horses.

If you would like to be considered, please email Adam Furlong, Project Manager, with a copy of your resume, at hiring@bwfurlong.com.

Equine Rehabilitation

One of the newest areas of focus for our practice is the sports medicine rehabilitation of our equine athletes. Furlong’s Soundness Center, our equine rehabilitation center, is conveniently located across the street from our main clinic in Oldwick, New Jersey. This state-of-the-art facility allows us to provide the highest quality of individualized care to every patient. Our team of doctors and technicians utilize a multi-modal approach to promote healing, with such technologies as the dry and water treadmills, saltwater hydrotherapy spa, and regenerative laser therapy in conjunction with physiotherapy and complementary medical techniques. The Soundness Center is equipped with with Horse Gym USA ® machines, which allow us to design a controlled exercise and rehabilitation program for each horse that comes through our facility. Continue reading

The Pre-Purchase Examination

 

Prior to the investment of purchasing or leasing a new horse, a complete pre-purchase examination is highly recommended. The format can be tailored to the individual needs of the client, but usually involves a thorough physical examination from head to tail. The horse is also observed for soundness, and digital radiographs are encouraged to establish a baseline of skeletal changes. Reproductive exams, ultrasound exams, and upper airway endoscopies are among the ancillary procedures also available.

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Down Horse Management

 

The cold weather can make life as horse owners challenging. Unfortunately, in the cold weather we tend to see and increased incidence of horses who have laid or fallen down, and are not able to get up on their own. Down horses are technically referred to as “recumbent”.

There are two basic categories of recumbency in horses. The first, and simplest, are horses that are systemically well, but are unable to get up normally based on environmental circumstance. This includes otherwise sound and healthy horses that lay down and are not able to get back up due to poor footing (ice, mud, etc), or positioning (cast against a wall, legs are uphill compared to back, etc.).  The second, and more challenging, are horses that are systemically unwell. The obvious horses in this category are those that are sick, dehydrated, colicky, etc., but horses with musculoskeletal problems, such as laminitis or arthritis are also included. It is important to remember that in the context of down horses, the musculoskeletal system can “fail” just like any other organ or body system.  Sometimes, this can be challenging to remember in cases of otherwise bright and happy horses that are down because they are very arthritic.

When faced with a down horse, the most important thing to do is remain safe, and call the veterinarian as soon as possible. One or two people alone are very unlikely to be able to meaningfully help a down horse (if it were that simple, they would be up on their own!), and are very likely to get hurt in the process. Calling the veterinarian in a timely matter is of the utmost importance. Horses do not tolerate prolonged recumbency well, and with time even the otherwise healthy recumbent horses may become dehydrated, aspirate and develop pneumonia, and accrue muscle and nerve damage, all of which make put them into the category of systemically unwell horses. While waiting for the veterinarian to arrive, try to clear the area around the horse from any hay bales, buckets, etc., and remove any other horses. When working around a down horse, you must remain calm and remember to always be within the “safe zone”, which is along the back of the horse from withers to tail. Down horses can become frantic, and it is important to remain out of the range of their heads and legs at all times.

The first thing a veterinarian will do is establish which of the above categories the down horse is in. Is the horse systemically well or unwell? If the horse is systemically unwell, what body systems are affected, and is there anything we can do to help? These questions are answered by our physical exam findings. Although limited due to safety concerns, we are able to get a lot of information from evaluating the horse’s attitude, ability to move each leg, heart and respiratory rates, mucous membranes, pulse and rectal temperature.

If the horse is systemically well, the next thing we do is develop a plan to help change the horse’s position while keeping everyone safe. If done correctly, this is actually fairly simple and safe to do. Typically, one of the first things we will do it try to flip the horse onto its other side. This will relieve any “pins and needles” they may be feeling from prolonged muscle and nerve compression. If this is not enough, there are several rescue maneuvers, such as forward drag and backward assist, which can be used to drag the horse to a more favorable location, either onto better footing, or away from fences, walls, hills, etc.

If the horse is systemically unwell, we first try to correct any fixable problems we have identified on physical exam. This often means placing an intravenous catheter, administering bute, banamine or steroids, and giving intravenous fluids. Unfortunately, the prognosis for horses that are down and systemically unwell is generally very poor; whatever disease caused them to go down and stay down in the first place will still be present, even if we temporarily get them standing. However, there are circumstances where rehydrating the horse and providing some pain relief can get them standing again, and then we can determine what their primary problem is, and if/how we can treat it and prevent them from going down again. In certain cases, a sling suspended from a sturdy beam can be used to lift and support a horse that we are unable to otherwise get up. The sling will support most of the horse’s weight and prevent them from going down again while we examine them and institute therapy. Typically, the sling is reserved for horses that we think will tolerate the device well, and that have problems that we believe to be fixable with some time and support. At B.W. Furlong and Associates we have one large hospital stall fitted for the sling system, and have successfully used the sling in the field under the appropriate circumstances.

 

Winter Woes: Keeping Your Horse Hydrated

Surely you’ve heard the expression, “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink,” but we’re here to tell you some tips and tricks to do just that! Although it’s a no brainer that horses need to drink adequate water to remain hydrated in the heat of the summer, it’s also a key factor in their winter wellbeing. Horses wintering in the northeast are managed on a forage diet of dry hays as opposed to more moisture-rich grasses they feed upon in the warmer months. This increase in dry matter consumption also increases the need for water intake. Not only is adequate water consumption necessary for cellular functions, it plays a huge role in successful digestion in the horse. So, let’s keep those impaction colics away this winter with these helpful tips to keep your horse hydrated!

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Employment Opportunity: Hospital Technician Director (FT/P)

Employment Opportunity: Hospital Technician Director (FT/P)
Employer: Brendan W. Furlong, MVB, Equine Veterinarian, PA
Employment start date: January 23, 2016

B.W. Furlong & Associates is an equine veterinary practice headquartered in Oldwick, NJ. The practice employs 14 veterinarians that practice in the Northeast, as well as 3 that practice in Florida and Virginia under the name Peak Performance Equine Services. It is an extremely fast-paced and busy practice, serving and caring for some of the most prestigious clientele in the country. The main practice consists of a full service ambulatory division, as well as a 4 acre facility that houses a full service 12 stall hospital, stallion collection station, lab, and advanced imaging capabilities. It also has separate properties that include a standing MRI and a rehabilitation center.  Employees of the company are all expected to demonstrate the core beliefs.

Responsibilities

  • Manage hospital team of ~ 4 technicians and ~ 3 interns, and liaison with veterinarians and front office.
  • Management responsibilities include: treatment plans & medical records, daily personnel deployment, on-call scheduling, stall assignments, hospital inventory & equipment, training protocols, conflict resolution, and backup coverage.
  • Assist Dr. Furlong with in-hospital cases, including, but not limited to, joint injections, lameness exams, pre-purchase examinations, and imaging. This would include handling, lunging, and jogging horses, and also prepping joints, obtaining and downloading radiographs, etc.
  • Stock Dr. Furlong’s truck on a daily basis based on needs of schedule
  • Provide treatments for hospital cases, including, but not limited to, preparing and administering medications, performing physical exams, placing catheters, running fluids, and assisting with diagnostics.
  • Provide tech coverage for surgery (growth opportunity)
  • Care for patients, including, but not limited to, grooming, feeding, mucking out, cleaning feed & water buckets, and turning out
  • Assist in maintenance of hospital grounds
  • Additional responsibilities as needed
  • Time will be spent ~ 25% managing, 25% assisting Dr. Furlong, and 50% providing treatments in the hospital.


Qualifications

  • Minimum three years working in an equine hospital
  • An outstanding team attitude and work ethic
  • Post high-school education in equine medicine
  • Veterinary technician license (LVT) is preferred
  • Excellent horse-horse handling skills are mandatory, including handling of fractious horses, ability to jog horses in hand, and proficiency in lunging horses
  • Good time management and multitasking skills
  • Ability to manage and direct team in areas of responsibility
  • Technologically proficient
  • Excellent handling emergency situations
  • Quick-thinker, self-motivated, and a fast learner

Hours are Monday-Friday, approximately 8a-4:30p, with average one night on call each week (5p-8a). Weekly hours will be approximately 37.5 hours. Benefits include hourly salary commensurate with experience, 401K, profit sharing, Health Insurance, and discounted veterinary services and products.

Please submit your cover letter and resume via email to Adam Furlong, Project Manager, at hiring@bwfurlong.com